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September 2019

Monday, 23 September 2019 00:00

Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury

If you are experiencing pain in the calf and in the back of the heel, you may have what is known as an Achilles tendon injury. This type of injury can produce severe discomfort, and it may be difficult to walk. It is a common ailment among people who enjoy running, and may occur from a lack of stretching the muscles before running or jogging begins. Additionally, it may develop as a result of wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or from an abrupt change in participating in sporting activities. The Achilles tendon connects the heel to the calf muscles, and if it should become inflamed, Achilles tendinopathy may occur. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this type of injury can include stiffness in the ankle and calf, and the first steps taken after arising in the morning may be uncomfortable. If you have any pain in the heel and the calf, it is strongly suggested that you speak to a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can properly diagnosis and treat an Achilles tendon injury.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Rosa Roman of Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 17 September 2019 00:00

Foot Symptoms Associated with Diabetes

Did you know that diabetes is responsible for over 50% of all foot amputations in the United States? That is why diabetes experts recommend that everyone, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, protect their feet with daily foot checks, wear supportive fitting socks and shoes, and complete a comprehensive foot exam by a podiatrist at least once a year. Two main foot problems that can occur with people who have diabetes are Peripheral Vascular Disease and Diabetic Neuropathy.  Other foot symptoms associated with people who have diabetes include loss of feeling, numbness or tingling sensations, blisters, skin discoloration, red streaks, and staining on their socks. If an infection develops the symptoms can worsen and include fever, chills, uncontrollable blood sugar, shock, and redness. With diabetes, since there can be numerous complications in the feet, it is strongly recommended that you consult with a podiatrist for the best prevention and treatment methods.

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Rosa Roman from Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 10 September 2019 00:00

Possible Causes of Ingrown Toenails

The medical term that is referred to as onychocryptosis, is more commonly known as an ingrown toenail. It typically develops as a result of the corner of the nail digging into the skin surrounding it, and this can produce severe pain and discomfort. Additional symptoms often consist of inflammation near the affected area, and there may be mild drainage if it becomes infected. Patients can experience ingrown toenails for a variety of reasons. These can include wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, toenails that have been trimmed incorrectly, or if an injury has happened to the toe. Moderate relief may be found when the toe is soaked in warm water several times per day. This can help to keep the skin soft around the affected nail. If you have an ingrown toenail, it is beneficial that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can guide you toward the correct treatment.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Rosa Roman of Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Thursday, 05 September 2019 00:00

Before you start dancing...

 

Published in Blog
Monday, 02 September 2019 00:00

What Causes Bunions?

First and foremost, a bunion is a deformity of the big toe. Typically, it’s a bony protrusion that forms on the side of the big toe. Less commonly, a bunion may form next to the small toe, also known as a “bunionette.” There are many causes for bunions. Tight shoes, especially shoes with a narrow toe box, (ex: cowboy boots and high heels) are the culprits of bunions in most patients. Genetics often play a significant role as well. Experts believe that certain foot types make a person more prone to developing bunions, and these foot types tend to run in families. One study found that 83 percent of people who have bunions have a family history of bunions. It is also said that people who have rheumatoid arthritis and neuromuscular conditions are more prone to bunions. If you feel you have a bunion or you are experiencing soreness, redness, stiffness, and/or swelling around the big toe joint, it is best to consult with your local podiatrist.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Rosa Roman of Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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