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July 2022

Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

Wearing High Heels With Flat Feet

If you have flat feet and want to wear high heels periodically, there should be no problem if you do not have underlying medical conditions and if doing so does not cause you pain. Flat feet, referred to as pes planus, is when the entire surface of the foot is in contact with the ground when standing. Flat feet can be flexible or rigid. A flexible flat foot looks flat when standing. A rigid flat foot is when the arch is absent whether the foot is bearing weight or not. Flat feet are generally caused by genetics, however, injuries, muscle weakness, foot bone deformities, pregnancy, being overweight, and pre-existing health conditions can also cause flat feet. Wearing high heels is difficult especially for those with flat feet. To bolster comfort with occasional high heel wearing, make sure the heels are the proper size, opt for thicker heels, which will help with balance and strain issues, and choose shoes with platforms under three inches. Arch support shoe inserts or silicone gel pads can offer some support in cushioning and comfort. Frequently kick off the heels to take breaks and stretch legs, ankles, and feet. Try putting together a supply rescue bag of tricks, including a flat, foldable shoe, anti-blister cream for sore feet and toes, and plasters for broken or damaged toenails. If you have flat feet, want to wear heels for a special outing and you have pain in your feet before or after doing so, consult with a podiatrist who can help diagnose the problem and provide suggestions and treatment.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Rosa Roman from Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What is Flexible Flat Foot?
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Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 19 July 2022 00:00

What Is Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease?

A congenital condition that affects the peripheral nervous system is called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. It occurs as a baby’s DNA begins to develop in the womb, and for that reason is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Charcot-Marie-Tooth is often detected during puberty, causing muscle weakness and difficulty walking. Later on it can also affect the arms and hands. Hammertoes and high arches are further signs of the disease. A child will notice a difficulty in running, a tendency to trip or fall, and a problem lifting the foot at the ankle. Falling may cause injuries to other body parts, making normal daily activities more problematic. If a child begins to drag their feet, has trouble going up and down steps, or marches instead of walking, it is a good idea to consult a podiatrist for an exam and diagnosis. Treatment may include braces to support the foot and certain medications. In some cases, surgery may become an option.


 

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Rosa Roman of Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Congenital Foot Problems
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Tuesday, 12 July 2022 00:00

Dealing With Seed Corns on the Foot

A seed corn, also known as heloma miliare, is a tiny round callus that forms on a weight-bearing part of the foot. Seed corns can develop anywhere there is repeated friction and are common to the ball of the foot or the bottom of the heel. Foot deformities, such as bunions or hammertoes, may change how you walk, increasing the chances that a seed corn will form. Seed corns are not particularly dangerous, but they can become painful when pressure or weight is applied, causing further gait problems. They can be prevented by wearing shoes that fit properly, with plenty of toe room and low heels. Seed corns may be linked with dry skin, so moisturizing the feet is important. Wearing socks to form a cushion between the foot and inside of the shoe may also help. Special orthotics may be necessary in cases of recurring or persistent seed corn formation. In that case, it is a good idea to consult a podiatrist for help with removal of the corns and creating a custom shoe insert that works for you.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Rosa Roman of Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns and Calluses
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Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) is a progressive condition that can cause pain in the ankle and foot, along with a flattening of the foot. If left untreated, PTTD may even cause arthritis. PTTD begins with some sort of degenerative change to the posterior tibial tendon which is an important structure in the foot. The tendon attaches the posterior tibialis muscle at the back of the leg with bones in the foot. It helps support the arch and aid the foot while walking. PTTD is often caused by overuse of the posterior tibial tendon. Swelling and pain in the foot and ankle (on the inside of the foot) may occur after hiking, walking, running, or climbing stairs. As the condition progresses, the arch will begin to flatten and the ankle may roll inward as the feet and toes turn outward. As the tendon continues to deteriorate, the foot will flatten even more, and the location of pain will shift to the outside of the foot, underneath the ankle. Arthritis may even develop in the ankle and foot in advanced PTTD. PTTD needs to be diagnosed early on when more conservative treatment methods have a better chance of halting the condition’s progression without the need for surgery. If you are experiencing any symptoms discussed here, consult with a podiatrist as soon as possible.


 

Ankle pain can have many different causes and the pain may potentially be serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with Dr. Rosa Roman from Ankle and Foot Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Ankle Pain
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